Natural herbal & homeopathic help for people involved in Drug Addiction and substance abuse

Drug Addiction
HEALTH HERBS & NUTRITION - REMEDIES - drug addiction

· General Description

· Symptoms

· Causes

· Herbal & Homeopathic Remedies

· Dos and Don'ts

Natural herbal & homeopathic products helpful in Drug Addiction, Drug Detox and substance abuse

General description and overview of Drug Addiction and substance abuse

Drugs are a cornerstone of modern medicine. They not only relieve pain and fight infection, but also alleviate depression and help us to sleep and save countless lives everyday. However, when these drugs are abused, the results are often devastating – for the abuser, for those who care about him, and for the society at large. Whether they are legal, easily obtained drugs like tobacco or alcohol, commonly abused prescription drugs such as tranquillizers or narcotics, or illicit drugs like heroin or cocaine, dependence on chemical substances has become one of the leading health problems of the world in general, and the developed nations in particular.

What is drug addiction?

Addiction is a chronic, often relapsing brain disease that causes compulsive drug seeking and use despite harmful consequences to the individual that is addicted and to those around him. It is widely considered a physiological condition. Drug addiction is a brain disease because the abuse of drugs leads to changes in the structure and function of the brain.

The disorder of addiction involves the progression of acute drug use to the development of drug-seeking behavior, the vulnerability to relapse, and the decreased, slowed ability to respond to naturally rewarding stimuli.

Although it is true that for most people the initial decision to take drugs is voluntary, over time the changes in the brain caused by repeated drug abuse can affect a person’s self control and ability to make sound decisions, and at the same time send intense impulses to take drugs.

It is because of these changes in the brain that it is so challenging for a person who is addicted to stop abusing drugs. Fortunately, there are treatments that help people to counteract addiction’s powerful disruptive effects and regain control. Research shows that combining addiction treatment medications with behavioral therapy is the best way to ensure success for most patients. Treatment approaches that are tailored to each patient’s drug abuse patterns and any co-occurring medical, psychiatric, and social problems can lead to sustained recovery and a life without drug abuse.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) has categorized three stages of addiction: preoccupation/anticipation, binge/intoxication, and withdrawal/negative affect. These stages are characterized, respectively, everywhere by constant cravings and preoccupation with obtaining the substance; using more of the substance than necessary to experience the intoxicating effects; and experiencing tolerance, withdrawal symptoms, and decreased motivation for normal life activities.

Similar to other chronic, relapsing diseases, such as diabetes, asthma, or heart disease, drug addiction can be managed successfully. However, as with other chronic diseases, it is not uncommon for a person to relapse and begin abusing drugs again. Relapse, however, does not signal failure—rather, it indicates that treatment should be reinstated, adjusted, or that alternate treatment is needed to help the individual regain control and recover.

Herbal & homeopathic products recommended for Drug Addiction and substance abuse

Detox Drops™

Promotes natural cleansing function and ability to eliminate toxins.

Product Details

MindSoothe™

Promote balanced mood, emotional health and feelings of wellbeing.

Product Details

MoodCalm™

Homeopathic remedy temporarily calms emotional outbursts and reduces mood swings.

Product Details

TOP

Symptoms of Drug Addiction and substance abuse

Essence of Addiction

Drug craving and the other compulsive behaviors are the essence of addiction. They are extremely difficult to control, much more difficult than any physical dependence. They are the principal target symptoms for most of the drug treatment programs. For an addict, there is no motivation more powerful than drug craving, so much so that, the addict’s entire life becomes centered on getting and using the drug. Virtually nothing seems to outweigh drug craving as a motivator. People have committed all kinds of crimes and even abandoned their children just to get drugs.

The following signs can recognize drug abuse and dependence (for these drugs’ effects, see table below):

  • Feeling that you NEED the drug on a regular basis
  • Ensuring that you have a constant supply of the drug
  • Behaving in uncharacteristic ways in order to use, such as stealing money, lying to loved ones, or becoming aggressive when something stands between you and your next drug taking session
  • Feeling helpless to deal with life’s problems and stressors with out the ‘help’ from your drug of choice
  • Repeatedly failing attempts at stopping your drug use
  • Development of tolerance towards the drug
  • Putting yourself and/or others in danger when under the influence, such as driving while intoxicated, or participating in other risky behaviors, including unprotected sex
  • Deterioration in relationships, work performance or financial status
  • Clashes with authority, the law or other legal problems
  • Justifying use – “everyone does it”, “need it to relax”, “it’s only sleeping tablets/marijuana”
Natural remedies for Drug Addiction, Drug Detox and substance abuse. Some individuals who have tried drugs or use them frequently will know when infrequent drug use becomes drug abuse and dependence. Denial however, is very powerful and may blind many people to the fact that drugs are becoming a problem.
Recognizing Drug Abuse in Teenagers
The following symptoms are not necessarily ‘proof’ of drug abuse and may be due to other problems. However, they may be seen as ‘warning signs’ which warrant further investigation. Also remember that each drug will have different signs and symptoms of use and abuse. Bearing this in mind, here are a few general signs you can look out for:
Physical:
  • Severe weight loss and/ or decreased appetite
  • Red eyes
  • Constricted or dilated pupils
  • Runny nose or repetitive sniffing
  • Depression and anxiety
  • Memory and concentration impairments
  • General listlessness, apathy and chronic fatigue
  • Itchiness or continuous scratching
Behavioral:
  • Drop in school performance and an increase in absenteeism
  • A sudden lack of interest in personal appearance and grooming
  • Distinct change in behavior. This may include your child being less involved in the family or locking his or her room for the sake of “more privacy”
  • Secretive behavior and frequent isolation
  • Sudden increase in requests for money, or noticing that money or valuable items keep disappearing from safe places in the house
  • Mood swings, aggression, or argumentative behavior
  • Ignoring curfews
  • Change in crowd of friends
  • Loss of interest in sports, hobbies or previously enjoyed interests
  • Accidents
  • Excessive sleeping or seems not to need sleep (Insomnia)
Paraphernalia:
  • Packets or envelopes with strange looking white or brownish powders
  • Broken bottle necks or light bulbs
  • Mirrors, tinfoil, straws or blades
  • Blackened teaspoons
  • Syringes – needles
  • Eye drops

Symptoms & herbal & homeopathic remedies for Drug Addiction, Drug Detox and substance abuse. Can we accept addictions?? No, this escalating drug toll is quite unacceptable, in terms of wasted lives, destabilized families, and escalating crime rates, quite apart from the costs of funding research programs, treatment facilities, and specialized law enforcement agencies.

TOP

Causes of Drug Addiction and substance abuse

Drugs causing addiction

COMMONLY ABUSED DRUGS AND THEIR EFFECTS

Type of drug

Effects

Long-term hazards

Withdrawal Symptoms
Central nervous system (CNS) stimulants (Amphetamine and Methamphetamine) Hyperactivity, faster pulse, appetite loss, sense of self-confidence and excitement followed by depression Tolerance, psychological dependence, paranoia, violent behavior, nervous exhaustion Exhaustion, irritability, severe depression, somnolence (drowsiness), weight gain
CNS stimulants (Cocaine, crack, nicotine) (Nicotine is dealt with in a separate article) Faster pulse, appetite loss, euphoria, restlessness, anxiety, depression Psychological dependence, nasal ulcers, paranoia, hallucinations, risk of heart failure Exhaustion, irritability, severe depression
CNS depressants, Sedatives and Hypnotics (Barbiturates, tranquillizers; Benzodiazepines, particularly alprazolam, clonazepam, temazepam, and nimetazepam; Methaqualone and the related quinazolinone sedative-hypnotics; alcohol) (Alcohol is dealt with in a separate article) Slowed heart rate and breathing, slurred speech, unsteady gait, confusion, lethargy Tolerance, dependence, risk of death by overdose (especially if combined with alcohol) Disorientation, jitteriness, sweating, delirium, convulsions, hallucinations; untreated withdrawal can be fatal
Hallucinogens (LSD and others) Hallucinations, paranoia, panic, violence, blank stare, muscle rigidity Tolerance, recurrence of effects, possible suicide, or fatal accident, long-term psychological damage No physical symptoms; a psychotic state may result from drug use and persist even after drug use ends
Opiates and Opioid analgesics (Semi-synthetic opiates such as Heroin (Diacetylmorphine), Oxycodone, and Hydromorphone; Morphine and Codeine, the two naturally-occurring opiate analgesics; Fully synthetic opioids, such as Fentanyl and its analogs, Meperidine/Pethidine, and Methadone) Euphoria, lethargy, slurred speech, mood swings, shallow breathing, loss of self-control Tolerance, dependence, malnutrition, risk of AIDS, hepatitis, fatal overdose Sweating, fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, muscle twitching, pain in joints and muscles
Cannabis (Marijuana, hashish) Euphoria, mood swings, panic, confusion, lack of coordination, hunger Psychological dependence, possible damage to lungs and reproductive system Long-term users may experience nausea and insomnia after drug use ends
Inhalants (model aeroplane glue, petrol, aerosols, dry cleaning fluid, paint thinners ) Giddiness, euphoria, confusion, flushed face Risk of brain, liver or kidney damage; possible death from heart failure or asphyxia Long-term users may experience headaches and insomnia after drug use ends

Addictive drugs also includes a large number of substrates that are currently considered to have no medical value and are not available over the counter or by prescription. Some of the other names related to common used drugs are Mandrax, Rohypnol, Ecstasy and Speed.

Addictive potency

The addictive potency of drugs varies from substance to substance, and from individual to individual. Drugs such as codeine or alcohol, for instance, typically require many more exposures to addict their users than drugs such as heroin or cocaine. Likewise, a person who is psychologically or genetically predisposed to addiction is much more likely to suffer from it.

What do these drugs do to your brain?

Drugs are chemicals that tap into the brain’s communication system and disrupt the way nerve cells normally send, receive, and process information. There are at least two ways that drugs are able to do this: (a) by imitating the brain’s natural chemical messengers, and/or (b) by over stimulating the “reward circuit” of the brain.

The reward circuit, also referred to as the mesolimbic system, is characterized by the interaction of several areas of the brain including ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAcc), prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala.

Some drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, have a similar structure to chemical messengers, called neurotransmitters, which are naturally produced by the brain. Because of this similarity, these drugs are able to “fool” the brain’s receptors and activate nerve cells to send abnormal messages.

Other drugs, such as cocaine or methamphetamine, can cause the nerve cells to release abnormally large amounts of natural neurotransmitters, or prevent the normal recycling of these brain chemicals, which is needed to shut off the signal between neurons. This disruption produces a greatly amplified message that ultimately disrupts normal communication patterns.

Nearly all drugs, directly or indirectly, target the brain’s reward system by flooding the circuit with dopamine. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter present in regions of the brain that control movement, emotion, motivation, and feelings of pleasure. The over stimulation of this system, which normally responds to natural behaviors that are linked to survival (eating, spending time with loved ones, etc), produces euphoric effects in response to the drugs. This reaction sets in motion a pattern that “teaches” people to repeat the behavior of abusing drugs.

As a person continues to abuse drugs, the brain adapts to the overwhelming surges in dopamine by producing less dopamine or by reducing the number of dopamine receptors in the reward circuit. As a result, dopamine’s impact on the reward circuit is lessened, reducing the abuser’s ability to enjoy the drugs and the things that previously brought pleasure. This decrease compels those addicted to drugs to keep abusing drugs in order to attempt to bring their dopamine function back to normal. And, they may now require larger amounts of the drug than they first did to achieve the dopamine high—an effect known as tolerance.

Long-term abuse causes changes in other brain chemical systems and circuits as well. Glutamate is a neurotransmitter that influences the reward circuit and the ability to learn. When the optimal concentration of glutamate is altered by drug abuse, the brain attempts to compensate, which can impair cognitive function. Drugs of abuse facilitate nonconscious (conditioned) learning, which leads the user to experience uncontrollable cravings when they see a place or person they associate with the drug experience, even when the drug itself is not available.


Causes & herbal supplements for Drug Addiction, Drug Detox and substance abuse. Brain imaging studies of drug-addicted individuals show changes in areas of the brain that are critical to judgment, decision-making, learning and memory, and behavior control.


Why do some people become addicted, while others do not?


The answers are complex and, in some respects, still incomplete.

No single factor can predict whether a person will become addicted to drugs or not. Risk for addiction is influenced by a person’s biology, social environment, and age or stage of development. The more risk factors an individual has, the greater the chance that taking drugs can lead to addiction. For example:

  • Biology.The genes that people are born with––in combination with environmental influences––account for about half of their addiction vulnerability. These ‘addictive personalities’ have their addiction determined by their biochemical and physiological make-up-and hence can be genetically inherited. Additionally, gender, ethnicity, and the presence of other mental disorders may influence risk for drug abuse and addiction.
  • Environment and psychological. A person’s environment includes many different influences––from family and friends to socioeconomic status and quality of life in general. Factors such as poor living conditions, family upheavals, social and peer pressures, physical and sexual abuse, stress and anxiety, and parental involvement can greatly influence the course of drug abuse and addiction in a person’s life.
  • Development. Genetic and environmental factors interact with critical developmental stages in a person’s life to affect addiction vulnerability, and adolescents experience a double challenge. Although taking drugs at any age can lead to addiction, the earlier that drug use begins, the more likely it is to progress to more serious abuse. And because adolescents’ brains are still developing in the areas that govern decision-making, judgment, and self-control, they are especially prone to risk-taking behaviors, including trying drugs of abuse.

TOP

Herbal & homeopathic remedies useful in Drug Addiction and substance abuse


Certain medications can be used to assist with different aspects of the detox and treatment process. Methadone and buprenorphine are some examples of prescription medications used to help reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms. While these drugs may be suitable for some people as a part of a broader treatment plan, it is advised that you research all possible side-effects and contra-indications of these medications.

Drugs and drug addiction are not new phenomena although the variety of synthetic drugs available increases on a daily basis. Addictive drugs such as opium and its derivatives have been around for centuries and have well-established treatment methods in the traditions of Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine in particular. Consequently there are a variety of natural herbal and homeopathic remedies that can help with the various problems associated with drug detox and withdrawals.

Certain herbal extracts such as Dandelion and Fennel can be used to increase liver functioning for detox purposes and will cleanse the toxins from the blood, fat cells, organs and urine, while others such as Passiflora and certain tissue salt compounds can help sooth anxious nerves and an agitated mind.

 
Herbal & Homeopathic Remedies Useful In Drug Addiction
  
  • Taraxacum officinalis (Dandelion) was commonly used in Native American medicine and is found in many parts of the world today. It contains bitter principles that have a tonic effect on the liver and digestive system. It is also a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, including Vitamins A, D, C, and B and iron, silicon, magnesium, zinc and manganese. In recent studies, Taraxacum officinalis was shown to have an effect on the body weight of laboratory animals. It is also known to support liver and gall bladder functioning and may help to maintain healthy blood pressure within the normal range as well as natural fluid balance in the body.
  • Kali. phosphoricum (D6) (Kali. phos.) is one of 12 biochemic tissue salts, introduced by Dr. Schussler in the late nineteenth century. This remedy was proved by Dr. Allen, and is suited to those who become introverted and solitary, tense, and uncommunicative when unwell. Physical symptoms are acute fatigue following an inability to stay still. Symptoms improve with rest, sleep, and gentle movement.
  • Hyoscyamus niger (6C)is beneficial for those who tend to be irritable and slightly hysterical. They may commonly give in to restlessness, make irrelevant answers, or talk of imaginary doings and grand plans. People who are highly suspicious or have the tendency to laugh at everything would benefit from Hyoscyamus.

  • Foeniculum vulgare (Fennel) is been in use since ancient times. In medieval times it was used to prevent 'growling stomachs' during church services! Apart from its naturally supportive properties for digestion, Fennel also helps to maintain liver, kidney and spleen health. Recent research has demonstrated fennel’s supportive effects on digestion. Animal and test-tube studies hint at a number of potentially useful benefits for the liver and gall bladder – as well as the healthy production of bile.

  • Ferrum phosphoricum (Ferrum phos. D6) is a homeopathic biochemic tissue salt that supports the absorption of iron in the body. The protective myelin sheath, which surrounds all nerve tissue, needs iron to supply this vital nutrient to the nerve cells it encases. Iron in hemoglobin also helps to keep all body tissue, including the brain, supplied with oxygen. Regular use of Ferrum phos. can help to prevent dizziness, headaches and restlessness and is of great benefit for those who tend to feel irritable, tense and tired.
      
  • Magnesium phosphate (Mag. phos. D6) well-known as a homeopathic painkiller, Mag. phos. is also of great benefit to the health of the nerves. It acts as a natural anti-spasmodic and a nerve and muscle relaxant and is also frequently recommended for stress headaches.   
  • Hypericum perforatum (Also known as St. John’s Wort) - This herb is often hailed as 'Nature's Prozac' and has been traditionally used for centuries to balance mood and safely support routine calm and mental equilibrium. In recent times, clinical studies have demonstrated that the administration of Hypericum may be more effective than a placebo. Studies have also demonstrated the effectiveness of St John’s Wort as opposed to prescription equivalents.
  • Pelargonium reniforme is a medicinal plant known to generations of Khoi/San descendants and Xhosa traditional healers for its health-supporting properties. Also known as 'Umckaloabo', it is traditionally used for a range of therapeutic functions and is well known for its supportive capacity on liver functioning and as a digestive tonic. This species of pelargonium is indigenous to the Eastern Cape of South Africa and grows wild, sending out long bulbous roots deep into the ground. The active ingredients are found in the bitter tasting root of the plant. Recent studies have shown indicated this herb can be beneficial in supporting the body’s ability to maintain balance between various body systems.
  • Passiflora incarnata (Also known as Passion Flower) - Like St John’s Wort, Passiflora has also stood up well to clinical studies which support its traditional usage as a calming and moderating herb. Passion Flower is traditionally regarded as nature's help for frazzled nerves – with the added benefit of being wholly organic and not addictive.

  • Nat. sulphuricum (D6)is found naturally in seawater and in the waters of hot springs. This salt was introduced as one of the 12 Schussler salts. Nat. sulph. (D6) is specifically beneficial to those who, when well, are even- keeled and sensible, but when unwell, fluctuate terribly to either end of the spectrum.

  • Tarentula (6C) is used to suit those who tend to become hyperactive with impatience that borders on angst, a sense of urgency, and a feeling of being unable to sit still. Those who tend to have rapid extreme mood swings and who may be manipulative would benefit from Tarentula. When sick, they still wish to be on-the-go. This hyperactivity prevents them from resting, which frequently extends the period of convalescence. Symptoms tend to worsen with noise.

   

Herbal & homeopathic products recommended for Drug Addiction and substance abuse

Detox Drops for Drug Addiction, Drug Detox and substance abuse.

Detox Drops™

Promotes natural cleansing function and ability to eliminate toxins.

Product Details

Calm Tonic for Drug Addiction, Drug Detox and substance abuse.

Calm Tonic™

Promotes nervous system health, maintains balanced mood and worry free mind.

Product Details

MindSoothe for Drug Addiction, Drug Detox and substance abuse.

MindSoothe™

Promote balanced mood, emotional health and feelings of wellbeing.

Product Details

MoodCalm for Drug Addiction, Drug Detox and substance abuse.

MoodCalm™

Homeopathic remedy temporarily calms emotional outbursts and reduces mood swings.

Product Details

 

Dos and don'ts and precautionary measures suggested in Drug Addiction and substance abuse


The ultimate goal of drug addiction treatment is to enable an individual to achieve lasting abstinence, but the immediate goals are to reduce drug abuse, improve the patient's ability to function, and minimize the medical and social complications of drug abuse and addiction. Like people with diabetes or heart disease, people in treatment for drug addiction will need to change behavior to adopt a more healthful lifestyle.

Treatments for drug addiction vary widely according to the types of drugs involved, amount of drugs used, duration of the drug addiction, personality, concept of spirituality or religion, mental or physical illness, and the social needs of the individual.

For example, the message from modern science is that in deciding which drugs are addicting and require what kind of societal attention, we should focus primarily on whether taking those causes uncontrollable drug seeking and use. One important example is the use of opiates, like morphine, to treat cancer pain. In most circumstances, opiates are addicting. However, when administered for pain, although morphine treatment can produce physical dependence - which now can be easily managed after stopping use - it typically does not cause compulsive, uncontrollable morphine seeking and use, addiction as defined here. This is why so many cancer physicians find it acceptable to prescribe opiates for cancer pain.

An opposite example is marijuana, and the question, whether it is addicting. There are some signs of physical dependence or withdrawal in heavy users, and withdrawal has been demonstrated in studies on animals. However, what matters much more is that every year more than 100,000 people, most of them adolescents, seek treatment for their inability to control their marijuana use. They suffer from compulsive, uncontrollable marijuana craving, seeking, and use. That makes it addicting, certainly for a large number of people.

Many different ideas circulate regarding what is considered a "successful" outcome in the recovery from addiction. It has widely been established that abstinence from addictive substances is generally accepted as a "successful" outcome; however, differences of opinion exist as to the extent of abstinence required.

In the USA and in many other countries, the goal of treatment for drug dependence is generally total abstinence from all drugs, which while theoretically the ideal outcome, is in practice often very difficult to achieve. Other countries particularly in Europe argue the aims of treatment for drug dependence to be more complex, with treatment aims including reduction in use to the point that drug use no longer interferes with normal activities such as work and family commitments, shifts away from more dangerous routes of drug administration such as injecting to safer routes such as oral administration, reduction in crime committed by drug addicts, and treatment of other comorbid conditions such as AIDS, hepatitis and mental health disorders. These kind of outcomes can often be achieved without necessarily eliminating drug use completely, and so drug treatment programs in Europe often report more favourable outcomes than those in the USA because the criteria for measuring success can be met even though drug users on the programme may still be using drugs to some extent. The supporters of programs with total abstinence from drugs as a goal stress that enabling further drug use mean prolonged drug use and a risk for an increase of total number of addicts; the participants in the program can introduce new users in the habit.

Focusing on addiction as compulsive, uncontrollable drug use should help clarify everyone's perception of the nature of addiction and of potentially addicting drugs. For the addict and the clinician, this more accurate definition forces the focus of treatment away from simply managing physical withdrawal symptoms and toward dealing with the more meaningful and powerful, concept of uncontrollable drug seeking use. The task of treatment is to regain control over drug craving, seeking and use.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy is an approach that looks at the relationship between thoughts feelings and behaviors, recognizing that a change in any of these areas can affect the whole. CBT sees addiction as a behavior rather than a disease and subsequently curable, or rather, unlearnable. CBT programs recognize that for some individuals controlled use is a more realistic possibility.

12 step program

One of many recovery methods is the 12-step recovery program, with prominent examples including Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous (NA). They are commonly known and used for a variety of addictions for the individual addicted and the family of the individual. Substance-abuse rehabilitation (or "rehab") centers frequently offer a residential treatment program for the seriously addicted in order to isolate the patient from drugs and interactions with other users and dealers. Outpatient clinics usually offer a combination of individual counseling and group counseling. Frequently a physician or psychiatrist will assist with prescriptions to assist with the side effects of the addiction (the most common side effect that the medications can help is anxiety).


Other Tips for Coping with Drug Addiction

  • The first step is admitting that you have a drug problem. There is usually a lot of denial, manipulation and dishonesty around an addicts desire to protect their addiction and so this step is often the hardest – but often the most important.
  • The second step is to seek help. Call your family doctor or psychologist for more information on treatment options and treatment facilities. Groups such as Narcotics Anonymous (NA) are worth exploring and can offer you helpful advice and support. Talk to a close friend or family member so that you feel less alone in your struggle to stop using.
  • Look at your life, the goals and dreams. A thorough self-evaluation can help you see how destructive your drug habit is and how it is taking you further away from your life goals.
  • Deal with emotions that are hindering your recovery. Depression, anxiety, guilt and shame all need to be dealt with before the real healing can begin.
  • Make amends for the harm you have caused and start taking responsibility for your actions.

Tips for Concerned Parents 
  
Coping with drug abuse in a loved one is something a lot of people have struggled with. It is never easy watching one’s children walk down a path of self destruction, throwing their potential away, and making irrational and blind decisions which may affect the rest of their lives. For this reason, it is important to obtain your own support and help should your child develop a drug problem. There are many support groups such as Tough Love that are specifically aimed at parents of drug abusers. These groups can offer invaluable advice and the support that you need to help you cope with and understand your child’s problem. It is also important to deal with the many feelings that come from being close to someone who is abusing substances - such as guilt, anger, depression and betrayal.

General dos & don'ts and homeopathic medicines for Drug Addiction, Drug Detox and substance abuse. Concerned parents should always confront and discuss drug use if it is suspected and an honest and open conversation should be the first line of action.


If after this, you still feel your child has a problem, consider making an appointment with a professional and revising house rules and boundaries.

Don’t hesitate to call your family doctor or psychologist if you are concerned and need more advise or contact the various support groups in your area. Below are other tips to avoid or confront drug abuse problems in your children:

  • Cultivate an open field of communication with your children, discussing topics like drugs, abortions, sex etc without shame. Make sure there is a strict policy of honesty between you and your children and that there is mutual respect.
  • Develop a close relationship with your child so that you are both able to openly discuss your thoughts and feelings. Set time aside to really get to know you child and spend quality time with him or her.
  • Get to know your child’s friends and interests. If you suspect drug use, monitor their activities closely and confront the issue as soon as it arises.
  • Raise your child in a safe, loving, and accepting home environment.
  • Talk to your children about the dangers of drugs and why you don’t want them to ever use them. Make sure they understand that it is not a rule that you are imposing on them as the dominant parent, but a wish for their safety and future. Help your child visualize a successful future with positive goals and dreams.
  • Set a reasonable curfew for your child and try being awake when he or she returns home. If possible, arrange to fetch them from social functions, especially in the evening.  Together, sit down and discuss what time is a reasonable curfew and decide on fair consequences should this curfew be broken. Remember to be flexible when the need arises so that your child learns to be honest rather than finding ways around these rules.
  • If your child is going out at night, let them know that you will be available to accept a collect call should anything go wrong.
  • Know the signs of drug abuse, and if you discover any problems, be supportive and offer your help while maintaining firm boundaries.

TOP

Herbal & homeopathic products recommended for Drug Addiction and substance abuse

Detox Drops™

Promotes natural cleansing function and ability to eliminate toxins.

Product Details

Calm Tonic™

Promotes nervous system health, maintains balanced mood and worry free mind.

Product Details

MindSoothe™

Promote balanced mood, emotional health and feelings of wellbeing.

Product Details

MoodCalm™

Homeopathic remedy temporarily calms emotional outbursts and reduces mood swings.

Product Details

 

Finally! A PROVEN METHOD to quit weed &
feel better in body & mind. No more
cravings and no "Need To Smoke Weed"


Change Your Life in 2-6 days.

Introducing

Quit Marijuana The Complete Guide

by Seb Grant

CLICK HERE