Natural remedies for Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

Tendinitis (Tendonitis)
Learn about alternative therapies including HOMEOPATHIC + HERBAL Remedies for all kinds of Tendonitis that quickly reduce acute pain and stiffness in the joints and muscles & promote the healing of connective tissue, cartilage and bones.

· Herbal & Homeopathic Remedies

· General Description

· Symptoms

· Causes

· Helpful Dietary Habits

· Dos and Don'ts

Natural herbal & homeopathic products for Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

Herbal & homepathic remedies useful in Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

Treatment of tendonitis generally aims at reducing inflammation and relieving pain. Other than that, if the affected area is given significant rest, the healing process will occur naturally in time. There are however various natural ingredients that support this natural healing process and help speed recovery, while alleviating associated symptoms such as pain and inflammation or swelling

Herbal & Homeopathic ingredients such as Meadowsweet, Magnesium phosphoricum and Matricaria recutita have powerful anti-inflammatory properties and both are renowned for their soothing effect on aching muscles. Arnica is also a well known ingredient that helps promote the healing of connective tissue, cartilage and bones.

The essential oils of peppermint, pine, and ginger also have a very soothing effect when used topically on the affected area. Peppermint essential oil has powerful anti-inflammatory properties while Ginger essential oil has a long history of use for soothing aches and pains.

Herbal & homeopathic products recommended in Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

Enfūz - Joint Support

Enfūz Joint not only provides for a person's basic nutritional needs, but this program contains powerful ingredients such as glucosamine, chondroitin, msm and Celadrin to support healthy joints and bones. It is especially for anyone who is interested in improving the overall health of their joints and bones.

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Finally, homeopathic ingredients like Dulcamara, Bryonia & Berberis when used in conjunction (as in the case of our below mentioned remedies):

- Reduce acute pain and stiffness in the joints and muscles
- Relieve inflammation in muscles and joints
- Help relieve sports injuries, as well as muscle and joint fatigue
- Assist healing after over-exertion and physical stress
- Support the natural healing process of the body
- Support healthy bones, cartilage, muscle, and connective tissue
- Soothe and relieves pain and promote faster healing after surgery (including cosmetic surgery) or after physical injury or trauma
- Promote disappearance of bruising

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General description & overview of Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)
 

A tendon is a flexible band of fibrous tissue that connects muscles to bones and transmits the mechanical effort of the muscles to the bone to cause movement. Tendons are found throughout the body, including the hands, wrists, elbows, shoulders, hips, knees, ankles, and feet. They can be small, like those found in the hand, or large, like the Achilles tendon in the heel.

Tendinitis is a condition where a tendon or the connective tissue that surrounds the tendon becomes inflamed. Often, the inflammation involves also the synovial sheath which protects the tendon and allows it to slide easily over a bony or joint surface, a condition known as tenosynovitis.  It can be traumatic or rheumatic in origin and can last between a week and six months.

This is often due to overuse (e.g., repetitive work activities), acute injury, or excessive exercise. People who are at higher risk of developing tendinitis include athletes, manual laborers, and computer keyboard users.

Acute tendinitis may become chronic if it is not treated. The areas most commonly affected are the shoulder (rotator cuff tendinitis), elbow (tennis elbow or golfer's elbow), wrist and thumb (de Quervain's disease), knee (jumper's knee), ankle (Achilles tendinitis), and hip. Calcific tendinitis, which occurs when calcium deposits build up in a joint, often appears in people with a chronic disease, such as diabetes.

Bursitis and tendinitis are both common conditions that involve inflammation of the soft tissue around muscles and bones.

Luckily, mother nature has provided with some herbal ingredients that have powerful anti-inflammatory properties and are renowned for their soothing effect on aching muscles. They promote the healing of connective tissue, cartilage and bones. Read more to learn more....


Natural remedies, medicines, treatment & cures for Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis). Occasionally, tendinitis may be due to diseases that affect the whole body, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout.

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Symptoms of Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)
 
  • Swelling
  • Tenderness
  • Intense joint pain (usually in the arm or leg) that worsens when you move the affected limb
  • Limited movement
  • Extension of the pain to the entire limb
  • Waking in pain during the night
  • Warmth and redness
  • Crepitus (crackling)
     

    Herbal & homeopathic products recommended in Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

    Enfūz - Joint Support

    Enfūz Joint not only provides for a person's basic nutritional needs, but this program contains powerful ingredients such as glucosamine, chondroitin, msm and Celadrin to support healthy joints and bones. It is especially for anyone who is interested in improving the overall health of their joints and bones.

    Product Details

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of tendinitis begins with a medical history and physical examination. The patient will describe the pain and circumstances in which pain occurs. The location and onset of pain, whether it varies in severity throughout the day, and the factors that relieve or aggravate the pain are all important diagnostic clues. Therapists and physicians will use manual tests called selective tissue tension tests to determine which tendon is involved, and then will palpate (a form of touching the tendon) specific areas of the tendon to pinpoint the area of inflammation. In the case of a torn tendon, x rays may help show which tendon is affected. The doctor may also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm a partial or total tear. MRIs detect both bone and soft tissues like muscles, tendons, and their coverings (sheaths).


Alternative medicines, treatments & remedies for Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis). X rays do not show tendons, but may be helpful in ruling out problems in the bone or arthritis.

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Causes of Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)
 

Tendinitis is most often the result of:

  • Overuse or a repetitive injury in the affected area - People such as carpenters, gardeners, musicians, and typists, who perform activities that require repetitive motions or place stress on joints are at higher risk for tendinitis.

  • Undertraining or poor technique in sports (Tennis, Golf, Cricket)

  • Falling, lifting or carrying heavy objects

  • Extreme or repeated trauma

  • An infection, arthritis, gout, thyroid disease, and diabetes can also bring about inflammation of a tendon.

  • It may also be seen with certain inflammatory conditions - for example, Reiter's syndrome (An inflammatory syndrome (etiology unknown) predominantly in males; characterized by arthritis and conjunctivitis and urethritis) or ankylosing spondylitis (A chronic form of spondylitis primarily in males and marked by impaired mobility of the spine; sometimes leads to ankylosis)

These conditions occur more often with age. Tendons become less flexible with age, and therefore, more prone to injury.

What Parts of the Body Are Affected?

Tendinitis causes pain and tenderness just outside a joint. Some common names for tendinitis identify with the sport or movement that typically increases risk for tendon inflammation. They include tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow, pitcher’s shoulder, swimmer’s shoulder, and jumper’s knee. Some common examples follow.

Tennis Elbow and Golfer’s Elbow

Structure of the Elbow

Tennis elbow (also called lateral epicondylitis) refers to an injury to the outer elbow tendon. It refers to a partial tearing and inflammation of the tendons that link the forearm muscles to the elbow. The name has tennis in it because it is generally caused by the combination of tight gripping and rotary movement used in tennis. Playing golf may cause similar painful problems on the inside of the elbow. The name given is Golfer’s elbow (also called medial epicondylitis). These conditions can also occur with any activity that involves repetitive wrist turning or hand gripping, such as tool use, hand shaking, or twisting movements. Carpenters, gardeners, painters, musicians, manicurists, and dentists are at higher risk for these forms of tendinitis. Pain occurs near the elbow, sometimes radiating into the upper arm or down to the forearm.

Herbal & homeopathic products recommended in Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

Enfūz - Joint Support

Enfūz Joint not only provides for a person's basic nutritional needs, but this program contains powerful ingredients such as glucosamine, chondroitin, msm and Celadrin to support healthy joints and bones. It is especially for anyone who is interested in improving the overall health of their joints and bones.

Product Details

Shoulder Tendinitis  and Impingement Syndrome




Two types of tendinitis can affect the shoulder. Biceps tendinitis causes pain in the front or side of the shoulder and may travel down to the elbow and forearm. Pain may also occur when the arm is raised overhead. The biceps muscle, in the front of the upper arm, helps stabilize the upper arm bone (humerus) in the shoulder socket. It also helps accelerate and decelerate the arm during overhead movement in activities like tennis or pitching.

Rotator cuff tendinitis causes shoulder pain at the tip of the shoulder and the upper, outer arm. The pain can be aggravated by reaching, pushing, pulling, lifting, raising the arm above shoulder level, or lying on the affected side. The rotator cuff is primarily a group of four muscles that attach the arm to the shoulder girdle/shoulder blade. The rotator cuff attaches the arm to the shoulder joint and allows the arm to rotate and elevate. If the rotator cuff and bursa are irritated, inflamed, and swollen, they may become compressed between the head of the humerus and the acromion, the outer edge of the shoulder blade. Repeated motion involving the arms, or the aging process involving shoulder motion over many years, may also irritate and wear down the tendons, muscles, and surrounding structures. Squeezing of the rotator cuff is called shoulder impingement syndrome.

Inflammation caused by rheumatoid arthritis may also cause rotator cuff tendinitis. Sports involving overuse of the shoulder and occupations requiring frequent overhead reaching are other potential causes of irritation to the rotator cuff or bursa, and may lead to inflammation and impingement.

Knee Tendinitis or Jumper’s Knee




If a person overuses a tendon during activities such as dancing, cycling, or running, it may elongate or undergo microscopic tears and become inflamed. Trying to break a fall may also cause the quadriceps muscles to contract and tear the quadriceps tendon above the knee cap (patella) or the patellar tendon below it. This type of injury is most likely to happen in older people whose tendons tend to be weaker and less flexible. Tendinitis of the patellar tendon is sometimes called jumper’s knee because in sports that require jumping, such as basketball, the muscle contraction and force of hitting the ground after a jump strain the tendon. After repeated stress, the tendon may become inflamed or tear.

People with tendinitis of the knee may feel pain during running, hurried walking, or jumping. Knee tendinitis can increase risk for ruptures or large tears to the tendon. A complete rupture of the quadriceps or patellar tendon is not only painful, but also makes it difficult for a person to bend, extend, or lift the leg; or to bear weight on the involved leg.

Achilles Tendinitis

Achilles tendon connects the leg muscles to the heel of the foot; it is in almost constant use in an active person. Achilles tendon injuries involve an irritation, stretch, or tear to the tendon connecting the calf muscle to the back of the heel. Achilles tendinitis is a common overuse injury, but can also be caused by tight or weak calf muscles or any condition that causes the tendon to become less flexible and more rigid, such as reactive arthritis or normal aging.

Achilles tendon injuries can happen to anyone who regularly participates in an activity that causes the calf muscle to contract, like climbing stairs or using a stair-stepper, but are most common in middle-aged “weekend warriors” who may not exercise regularly or take time to warm up and stretch properly before an activity. Among professional athletes, most Achilles injuries seem to occur in quick-acceleration or jumping sports like football, tennis, and basketball, and usually end the season’s competition for the athlete.

 
Lateral View of the Ankle

Achilles tendinitis can be a chronic condition. It can also cause what appears to be a sudden injury. Tendinitis is the most common factor contributing to Achilles tendon tears. When a tendon is weakened by age or overuse, trauma can cause it to rupture.

De Quervain’s disease

It is a form of tendinitis in which the coverings of the tendons that lead from the wrist to the thumb become irritated and cause tenderness and pain in the area. The repetitive action of typing can bring it on, as can activities that involve the gripping of tools – even playing golf.

   

Herbal & homeopathic products recommended in Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

Enfūz - Joint Support

Enfūz Joint not only provides for a person's basic nutritional needs, but this program contains powerful ingredients such as glucosamine, chondroitin, msm and Celadrin to support healthy joints and bones. It is especially for anyone who is interested in improving the overall health of their joints and bones.

Product Details

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Helpful dietary recommendations in Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

 
  • Avoid chips and packaged and processed foods that contain hydrogenated oils, and avoid fried foods, which are often cooked in those oils. These substances increase the inflammation in your body.

  • Include in your diet anti-inflammatory oils such as those found in cold-water fish (salmon, trout, mackerel, herring and sardines), nuts, and seeds (linseeds). They contain omega-3 oils, which although not a direct anti-inflammatory, can lessen the amount of inflammatory chemicals your body produces over time.

  • Vitamin C with flavonoids for connective tissue repair - Some rich sources of vitamin C are oranges, green peppers, watermelon, Rose Hips, papaya, parsley, grapefruit, cantaloupe, strawberries, kiwi, mango, broccoli, tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, currants, cabbage, and citrus juices or juices fortified with Vitamin C.

  • Turmeric – Curcumin is the active constituent in turmeric, the yellow Indian spice that is a key ingredient in many curry recipes. Turmeric has an age old reputation as an anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving agent. But it seems to be curcumin that does the real work: it inhibits the synthesis of prostaglandins –hormone like compounds in the body that are involved in the transmission of pain signals. Take a teaspoon of turmeric in a glass of lukewarm milk at bedtime for best results.

  • As the cause is the drying up of the Synovial lubricating fluid in the joints, eating some avocado daily is considered helpful in restoring normalcy. Avocado also provides you with vitamin E.

  • Drink at least eight glasses of water daily to eliminate unwanted toxins from the body

  • A bowl of cherries is reputed to ease arthritic pain; eat at least 20 cherries a day for pain relief equivalent to one aspirin.

  • Alternative healthcare practitioners frequently recommend proteolytic enzymes (enzymes that catalyze the splitting of proteins into smaller peptide fractions and amino acids by a process known as proteolysis) for various minor injuries. These enzymes are also well absorbed when taken by mouth, and are quite effective in reducing pain and swelling associated with various injuries and for speeding up the healing process. Bromelain, a proteolytic enzyme, is an anti-inflammatory agent and for this reason is helpful in healing minor injuries, particularly sprains and strains, muscle injuries, and the pain, swelling, and tenderness that accompany sports injuries. Pineapples are the best dietary sources of bromelain.

  • There is some suggestion that a low intake of the antioxidants selenium and vitamins A, C and E may increase the risk of tendinitis. Hence, make sure that your diet includes plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables for vitamin C and beta carotene (which the body converts into vitamin A). Avocados, fresh nuts and olive oil will provide vitamin E and fish oils, cereals, eggs, and brewer’s yeast will supply selenium.


Herbal supplements for Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis). Vitamin C rich food goes a long way in providing not only an antioxidant rich diet but also boosting the immunity to fight against infections.


Dos & don'ts (precautionary measures) in Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

Take rest

Usually, when people feel the pain of tendinitis during or after exercise, and if it isn’t too bad, they think that they could run a race or swim laps with the same amount of pain. Sadly, it is not the case. If the pain is severe and you continue to abuse the tendon, it may rupture which could result in a long lay off, surgery, or even permanent disability. Therefore, it is advisable to take a day or two off immediately when you get the tendonitis pain.

Do not take absolute rest

Slightly confusing!! Yes, but then your muscles start to atrophy (a weakening or degeneration, especially through lack of use) if you take absolute rest and that too for a long time. Hence, if (and this is many times the case) your tendonitis is exercise induced, switch to a new exercise regime which is less demanding. For example, a runner may just take a walk or instead hop onto a bicycle.

Ice-n-fire!

Ice may also be used in acute injuries as it helps ease the pain and inflammation, but most cases of tendonitis are considered chronic, and ice is not helpful. When ice is needed, an ice pack can be applied to the affected area for 15-20 minutes every 4-6 hours for 3-5 days. After about 3 days of giving joints the cold treatment – by this time the heat of the joint should be gone – start alternating heat and cold treatment. Heat will increase the blood flow to the injury, helping it heal faster. Use a microwavable heatpack or an electric heating pad. Repeat these alternating treatments for 10 – 10 minutes at least 3-4 times. The last stage of heating pad can be used after applying castor oil over the affected areas.

Compresses

Use a soothing ginger compress to help ease the pain from the outside in. Chop 2 tablespoons fresh root ginger, mix into 500ml boiling water and leave to steep for 20 minutes. Immerse a folded piece of cloth in the warm tea and wring it out. Lay the damp cloth over your sore joint for 5 minutes. Repeat 3-4 times daily. Alternatively, a compress made with a paste of powdered slippery elm is also thought to help reduce inflammation, thereby reducing the associated pain.

Bands & Bandages

In some cases (e.g., in tennis elbow), elbow bands may be used to compress the forearm muscle to provide some pain relief, limiting the pull of the tendon on the bone. Other protective devices, such as foot orthoses for the ankle and foot or splints for the knee or hand, may temporarily reduce stress to the affected tendon or bursa and facilitate quicker healing times, while allowing general activity levels to continue as usual.

TENS

Preliminary studies have suggested that daily use of TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) for one to two weeks reduces or eliminates pain in patients with tendinitis.


Homeopathic medicines for Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis). Ergonomic keyboard reduce the severity of pain and improve hand function in computer workers with arm and wrist tendinitis.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture may be an effective therapy for tennis elbow. Acupuncturists report that patients with tendinitis frequently exhibit a primary deficiency in the liver meridian, with a relative excess in the gallbladder meridian. In addition to needling treatment on the liver meridian and the supporting kidney meridian, treatments using moxibustion (a technique in which the herb mugwort is burned over specific acupuncture points) may also be included. Needling and moxibustion may also be directly applied to painful areas and related sore points. Hence, acupuncture treatment produces significantly higher scores on a combined measurement of pain, ability to perform daily activities, ability to move shoulder without pain, and strength.

A technique known as Balance Method acupuncture can be effective in treating many musculoskeletal problems, including tendinitis.

Chiropractic

Chiropractors commonly treat this condition with ultrasound, electrical muscle stimulation, manual trigger point therapy (applying firm pressure by hand on a trigger point for several seconds and then stretching the muscle afterwards), and massage. Joint manipulation may also be performed on individuals with diminished joint mobility.

To help prevent inflammation or reduce the severity of its recurrence:

  • Warm up or stretch before physical activity. Stretching is extremely important as a warm-up. It prevents the shortening of muscles and tendons that goes along with exercise. People who are less flexible are more prone to develop tendonitis. Hence, stretching should be a regular part of the routine.

  • Strengthen muscles around the joint. You don’t need to become a bodybuilder for that. Just get better defined muscles by working out at home with light weights.

  • Physical changes to the work environment, such as setting up the work station so that the body is in a balanced, untwisted position, minimizing the need to use excessive force, avoiding overuse of any one joint, changing positions frequently, and allowing for rest periods, have all been shown to diminish symptoms of lower arm tendinitis.

  • Take breaks from repetitive tasks often. This is a simple way to at least temporarily relieve stress at work.

  • Cushion the affected joint. Use foam for kneeling or elbow pads. Increase the gripping surface of tools with gloves or padding. Apply grip tape or an oversized grip to golf clubs.

  • Use two hands to hold heavy tools; use a two-handed backhand in tennis.

  • Practice good posture and position the body properly when going about daily activities.

  • Begin new activities or exercise regimens slowly. Gradually increase physical demands following several well-tolerated exercise sessions.

  • Raising the affected area is also good for controlling the inflammation.

    Use the above mentioned herbal & homeopathic remedies and take the necessary precautions, and your aching arm, shoulder or knee will be as strong as can be.

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Herbal & homeopathic products recommended in Tendonitis/Tendinitis (rotator cuff, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, de Quervain's disease, jumper's knee, Achilles tendinitis)

Enfūz - Joint Support

Enfūz Joint not only provides for a person's basic nutritional needs, but this program contains powerful ingredients such as glucosamine, chondroitin, msm and Celadrin to support healthy joints and bones. It is especially for anyone who is interested in improving the overall health of their joints and bones.

Product Details

 

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